15 Items You Probably Didn’t Know Were Hazardous Waste — Bob Vila : Trusted Home Renovation & Repair Expert

Many things we use every day in our homes, gardens, or workshops are so common that we may find it hard to believe they’re classified as hazardous waste and should as a result should be disposed of appropriately. Instead, we toss them in the garbage along with ordinary trash and food scraps, where they could…

via 15 Items You Probably Didn’t Know Were Hazardous Waste — Bob Vila : Trusted Home Renovation & Repair Expert

Over-improving your Home: doing too much of a good thing — Bill Nickerson’s Blog

Homeowners doing major renovations this summer may not want to hear it, but there’s actually such a thing as doing too much. Spending too much. Adding too much. Bankrate‘s Dana Dratch says over-improving means you may be bringing a curse upon yourself: sinking so much into upgrades, renovations or additions that you’ve burned nearly all […]

via Over-improving your Home: doing too much of a good thing — Bill Nickerson’s Blog

Your Guide to January


National Trivia Day 

Impress your friends with the interesting facts that fill your brain. Or wow a roomful of people by attending a local trivia event!


National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day 

Show support for local officers by sharing a positive story on social media, wearing blue, or displaying blue lights outside your home.


Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

This day is not just about honoring the man; it’s also about contributing to your community to honor his legacy.


National Pie Day [not Pi Day!] 

Sweet or savory, meat or fruit, we really don’t mind as long as it’s pie!


Chinese New Year

Usher in the Year of the Rat with red envelopes, new clothes, and a break from cleaning!

​​

Have Fun at Work Day

Organize a potluck lunch or ping pong tournament, bring in massage chairs, and take some time out of your day to really enjoy where you work!

The Red Sox lost Babe Ruth to the NY Yankees — for $125,000.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt founded the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which later became known as the March of Dimes.

Alaska became the first noncontiguous state.

The rainbow Apple logo was developed and company founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak introduced the Apple II computer to the public.

HBO aired the pilot episode of The Sopranos, only the second original drama it had ever made (The Wire was the first hour-long drama).

Free online encyclopedia Wikipedia launched.


Celebrities born in January include Hayao Miyazaki, Ellen DeGeneres, Dolly Parton, Oprah Winfrey, and Justin Timberlake.

Tips for Showing Houses in the Winter

When winter weather strikes, you may think it’s time to stop putting your house out there, but don’t worry. You can still successfully show a house in the winter months, but it will take a little extra preparation. In fact, buyers who are shopping in the winter are often highly motivated, because they typically have an urgent need to move during the “off season.” This, combined with fewer houses on the market in many communities, can lead to an easier sale. Here are some tips to help you showcase your home well, even if the snow and ice are hitting your community.

Keep Walkways Clear

Make sure that people who are interested in your home can clearly see the path from driveway to front door. This means shoveling and salting all season long. You need to be proactive about this, even if the snow is actively falling, because footprints from people walking on freshly fallen snow can turn into dangerous ice. Also, keep that “for sale” sign free of snow, so people who drive by know the home is available.

Leave Space for Wet Shoes

Have a space by your front door where potential buyers can leave wet shoes. Most buyers will be respectful enough not to tramp into your home wearing wet shoes, if you provide a spot for them. Be prepared for some extra cleaning, though, because some potential buyers won’t feel comfortable removing their shoes.

Turn on the Lights

When you leave your home for a potential showing, turn on all of the lights. Winter tends to be a darker time of year, and you want your home to show as clearly as possible. In addition, open all blinds and curtains to let in as much natural light as possible.

Make It Warm

Even if you enjoy a little chill in the air during the winter, buyers should feel warm and toasty when they walk in. During showings, increase the thermostat a little higher than usual before buyers arrive, then set it back to your comfort level during the showing to keep the furnace from kicking on while the buyers are in the home.

Take Photos Strategically

If you have the freedom to, take the photos of your home on a day when there is either fresh snow or before the grass dies at the end of fall. The photos will live on the Internet for a while, so you want them to showcase the home well. A dreary yard with half melted snow may cause the home to show poorly.

Selling your home in the winter is possible, and can even be quite successful, but it does require a little strategic planning. With these tips, you can have a successful winter home sale.

Your Guide To December

Close out 2019 with a month full of celebrations!

Whether it’s buying someone a coffee or raising funds for an important cause, consider how you can show your generosity today.

 

 Pearl Harbor Day 

In remembrance of the lives that were lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

 

 

 

Wreaths Across America Day 

Wreath-laying ceremonies across the country honor all the veterans of America’s armed forces who will be missed this holiday season.
Join Us In Billericamore info

 

 

 First Day of Winter 

‘Tis the season for sweater weather! (BTW, what temperature calls for a sweater? Different states have different opinions.)

 

 

 

Hanukkah Begins

A celebration of love and light. Happy Hanukkah!

 

 

​​

 Christmas

 “Christmas isn’t a season. It’s a feeling.” — Edna Ferber

 

 

 

Kwanzaa Begins

Family, community, and culture are the cornerstones of this week-long pan-African celebration.

 

 

​​ 

New Year’s Eve

 We’re heading into the new year with 2020 vision. Cheers to all the possibilities!

 

 

What Is Veterans Day?

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. Unlike Memorial Day, Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans—living or dead—but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

When Is Veterans Day?

veterans-day-300x249

  • Veterans Day occurs on November 11 every year in the United States.
  • In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day.
  • In 1968, the Uniform Holidays Bill was passed by Congress, which moved the celebration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. The law went into effect in 1971, but in 1975 President Gerald Ford returned Veterans Day to November 11, due to the important historical significance of the date.
  • Great Britain, France, Australia and Canada also commemorate the veterans of World War I and World War II on or near November 11th: Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday (the second Sunday of November).
  • In Europe, Great Britain and the Commonwealth countries it is common to observe two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. every November 11.

Veterans Today

The military men and women who serve and protect the U.S. come from all walks of life; they are parents, children, grandparents, friends, neighbors and coworkers, and are an important part of their communities. Here are some facts about the veteran population of the United States:

  • 18.2 million living veterans served during at least one war.
  • 9% of veterans are women.
  • 7 million veterans served during the Vietnam War.
  • 5.5 million veterans served during the Persian Gulf War.
  • Of the 16 million Americans who served during World War II, about 496,777 are still alive as of 2018.
  • 2 million veterans served during the Korean War.
  • 6 million veterans served in peacetime.
  • As of 2015, 3.89 million veterans received compensation for service-connected disabilities.
  • As of 2017, the top 3 states with the highest percentage of veterans among their population: Alaska, Montana & Maine.
  • The VA health care system had 54 hospitals in 1930, since then it has expanded to include 170 medical centers; more than 1,063 outpatient, community, and outreach clinics.

 

Find Out Where You Can Be Apart Of Veterans Day Celebrations

Your Guide To November

A highlight of this month’s happenings.

 

 

 

 Veterans Day 

 The Dept. of Veterans Affairs estimates there are around 19 million veterans in the U.S. You probably know one — so hug a vet today!

Are you ready to take your recycling game to the next level? Take the pledge!

 

 

 
Take a Hike Day 

 Whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned hiker, find a trail near you and enjoy the scenic wilderness in your area.

  

 

 Education Support Professionals Day 

 Show some love to your school’s front office staff, bus drivers, security staff, and other support staff who contribute to a child’s education.

 


Thanksgiving 

 The practice of sending turkeys to the White House began in the 1870s. In 1989, George H.W. Bush granted the first official turkey “pardon.”

 

 

 

​​Small Business Saturday 

 Support neighborhood businesses during one of the busiest shopping weekends in the year by choosing to shop local.

 

 

While nearly any warmer-than-usual day in fall is often called Indian summer, a true Indian summer must have these traits:

  • Occurs between Nov. 11 and Nov. 20

  • Warm weather following a period of true cold weather or a hard frost

  • A hazy atmosphere

  • Clear and cool nights, in significant contrast to the daytime temperatures

Produce in season this month includes apples, arugula, bok choy, cauliflower, chard, endive, leeks, onions, parsnips, pears, pumpkins, radishes, and spinach.