What Is Veterans Day?

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. Unlike Memorial Day, Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans—living or dead—but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

When Is Veterans Day?

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  • Veterans Day occurs on November 11 every year in the United States.
  • In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day.
  • In 1968, the Uniform Holidays Bill was passed by Congress, which moved the celebration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. The law went into effect in 1971, but in 1975 President Gerald Ford returned Veterans Day to November 11, due to the important historical significance of the date.
  • Great Britain, France, Australia and Canada also commemorate the veterans of World War I and World War II on or near November 11th: Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday (the second Sunday of November).
  • In Europe, Great Britain and the Commonwealth countries it is common to observe two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. every November 11.

Veterans Today

The military men and women who serve and protect the U.S. come from all walks of life; they are parents, children, grandparents, friends, neighbors and coworkers, and are an important part of their communities. Here are some facts about the veteran population of the United States:

  • 18.2 million living veterans served during at least one war.
  • 9% of veterans are women.
  • 7 million veterans served during the Vietnam War.
  • 5.5 million veterans served during the Persian Gulf War.
  • Of the 16 million Americans who served during World War II, about 496,777 are still alive as of 2018.
  • 2 million veterans served during the Korean War.
  • 6 million veterans served in peacetime.
  • As of 2015, 3.89 million veterans received compensation for service-connected disabilities.
  • As of 2017, the top 3 states with the highest percentage of veterans among their population: Alaska, Montana & Maine.
  • The VA health care system had 54 hospitals in 1930, since then it has expanded to include 170 medical centers; more than 1,063 outpatient, community, and outreach clinics.

 

Find Out Where You Can Be Apart Of Veterans Day Celebrations

Your Guide To November

A highlight of this month’s happenings.

 

 

 

 Veterans Day 

 The Dept. of Veterans Affairs estimates there are around 19 million veterans in the U.S. You probably know one — so hug a vet today!

Are you ready to take your recycling game to the next level? Take the pledge!

 

 

 
Take a Hike Day 

 Whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned hiker, find a trail near you and enjoy the scenic wilderness in your area.

  

 

 Education Support Professionals Day 

 Show some love to your school’s front office staff, bus drivers, security staff, and other support staff who contribute to a child’s education.

 


Thanksgiving 

 The practice of sending turkeys to the White House began in the 1870s. In 1989, George H.W. Bush granted the first official turkey “pardon.”

 

 

 

​​Small Business Saturday 

 Support neighborhood businesses during one of the busiest shopping weekends in the year by choosing to shop local.

 

 

While nearly any warmer-than-usual day in fall is often called Indian summer, a true Indian summer must have these traits:

  • Occurs between Nov. 11 and Nov. 20

  • Warm weather following a period of true cold weather or a hard frost

  • A hazy atmosphere

  • Clear and cool nights, in significant contrast to the daytime temperatures

Produce in season this month includes apples, arugula, bok choy, cauliflower, chard, endive, leeks, onions, parsnips, pears, pumpkins, radishes, and spinach.

 

 

Your Guide to October

Key dates for a fun, festive month!

 

National Taco Day

Seek out your favorite taco stand and chow down on this Mexican staple. ¡Delicioso!

 

 

 

 

Fire Prevention Day

 Part of Fire Prevention Week, this day commemorates the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 and reminds us to always practice fire safety.

 

 

 

National Chess Day

Did you know? The longest recorded chess game took over 20 hours, consisted of 269 moves, and ended in a draw!

 

 

 

 

Indigenous Peoples’ Day

 Seven states currently celebrate a variation of this day as an alternative to Columbus Day.

 

 

Unity Day/National Stop Bullying Fall

Wear orange today to show you’re part of the solution and to unite with others to support anti-bullying efforts.

 

 

 

 

 Halloween

 Have a safe and sweet-filled Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

October is the chosen month to commemorate all different types of food: from sausage and seafood, American cheese, chili, and cookies, to pasta, pork, pretzels, and pizza. Now you have an excuse to indulge in your favorite dishes

It’s also Adopt a Shelter Dog month. Adopt, don’t shop, and provide a needy fur baby with a forever home. You may even enjoy reduced adoption fees this month at your local shelter.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) and the National Hockey League (NHL) both kick off their seasons in October.

 

Your Guide to September

Goodbye summer, hello fall!

 

National Wildlife Day

The U.S. has over 1,300 endangered species.* Be an advocate for wildlife by supporting your local zoo or animal sanctuary and educating others to do the same.

 

 


Grandparents’ Day

There’s nothing like the bond between grandparents and their grandchildren. Learn how you can #DoSomethingGrand at grandparentsday.org.

 

 


Patriot Day

Help turn a day of tragedy into a day of doing good. Make a positive impact by volunteering on this National Day of Service and Remembrance.

 

 

National Cleanup Day

Whether it’s picking up just one piece of trash or joining a team cleanup event, do your part to keep Mother Nature litter-free.

 

 

First Day of Fall

“Winter is an etching, spring a watercolor, summer an oil painting and autumn a mosaic of them all.” — Stanley Horowitz

 

 


 Rosh Hashanah Begins

Two days of introspection and jubilation usher in the Jewish New Year and begin the 10 days of penitence that end with Yom Kippur.

 

 

 

 

September is Hispanic Heritage Month — an invitation to celebrate Hispanic and Latino culture across America and recognize the numerous ways Hispanic Americans have contributed to our nation.

Pro football is back! The NFL opening game kicks off Thursday, September 5.

On September 5, 1774, the first Continental Congress was called to order, serving as the first government of the 13 colonies and eventually the United States.

 

Your Guide To July

Hot fun in the summertime.

 

 

Wimbledon Championships Begin

Started in 1877, Wimbledon is the world’s oldest and most prestigious tennis championship.

 

 

 

 

World UFO Day

Do aliens exist? Are flying saucers real? Look to the skies: The truth is out there!

 

 

 

 

Independence Day

It’s America’s 243rd birthday party, and we’re all invited! Happy Independence Day!

 

 

 

 

World Emoji Day

 When you’re unsure what to say, let emojis do the talking!

 

 

 

 

National Ice Cream Day

The perfect way to take a break from the summer heat. Go ahead, get that extra scoop.

 

 

 

International Day of Friendship

“Friends are the family we choose for ourselves.” — Edna Buchanan

 

 

 

 

 

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the MLB All-Star Games, first held on July 6, 1933, in Chicago’s Comiskey Park.

The month of July was named after Julius Caesar.

The “dog days of summer,” which run from July 3 through August 11, are often thought of as the hottest days of the year. While that may be true, the phrase actually refers to the sun’s orientation with Sirius — aka the Dog Star.

Summer Activities in Billerica!

Looking for some quality family fun right here in town? Well mark your calendars!

Start the summer off with the Summer Kick Off This Saturday!

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Then Head off to the Lampson and camp out at the The Great American Campout!

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And don’t miss out on FREE Movie nights!

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While we are at it, let’s put a rocking fun break in the
week with
 The  Summer Concert Series

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But wait…It doesn’t end there…you can take the kids to the Splash Pad at Warren Manning Park! Walk the Trails and play in the water!

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Head to the Beach! Micozzi Beach that is! Play in the sand…rent a canoe, kayak or stand up paddle boards…play some volleyball…or go fishing! 

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Enjoy Billerica in the Summer!

For more information check out the Billerica Recreation Website or the Town Of Billerica Website

In honor of flag day!

As a child of career military father, a flag was always present at our home and I proudly display mine at my home.

People show their love for America by displaying flags along streets, hanging them from porches, and proudly carrying them in the town parade. Old Glory is everywhere. But did you know there are official rules on properly displaying the U.S. flag? This guide from USAGov, based on the Federal Flag Code, can help you show respect for the flag:

  • When: You can display the flag outside from sunrise to sunset. If you want to fly it after dark, it will need to be lit. Don’t fly the flag during bad weather, unless it’s an all-weather flag.
  • On the porch: The union of the flag–the blue section with white stars–should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff. When the flag is suspended from a rope on a pole extending from a house, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building.
  • On the wall or the window: When the flag is displayed on a flat surface like a wall, the union should be at the top left.
  • On the street: The flag should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street. The flag should never touch anything beneath it, so make sure it’s hoisted at the proper height.
  • At the office: Suspend the flag vertically with the union to the observer’s left upon entering. If the building has more than one main entrance, the flag should be suspended vertically near the center of the corridor or lobby with the union to the north when entrances are to the east and west, or to the east when entrances are to the north and south. If there are entrances in more than two directions, the union should be to the east.
  • On a vehicle: The staff should be fixed firmly on the right side of the vehicle. Do not drape the flag over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or a boat.
  • Half-staff: During periods of mourning, it is common to see the flag flying at half-staff. Only presidents can proclaim such periods for a national remembrance. Governors can also declare mourning periods at a local level. In some cases, heads of federal agencies can order the flag flown at half-staff on grounds under their supervision. Traditionally, states and local governments follow the president’s proclamation during a period of national mourning.

Take care of your flag. Many dry cleaners will clean U.S. flags for free during the months of June and July. Store your flag in a well-ventilated area. If it gets wet, make sure it’s completely dry before storing it. If the flag is damaged or worn out, it should be burned and disposed of with dignity.  Many American Legions will hold a disposal ceramony on flag day if you need a place to drop of your old flags.

This Flag day, show your patriotism by proudly displaying the old Red, White and Blue!

How to fold the Flag

Step 1

To properly fold the Flag, begin by holding it waist-high with another person so that its surface is parallel to the ground.

Step 2

Fold the lower half of the stripe section lengthwise over the field of stars, holding the bottom and top edges securely.

Step 3

Fold the flag again lengthwise with the blue field on the outside  .

Step 4

Make a triangular fold by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge to meet the open (top) edge of the flag.

Step 5

Turn the outer (end) point inward, parallel to the open edge, to form a second triangle.

Step 6

The triangular folding is continued until the entire length of the flag is folded in this manner.

Step 7

When the flag is completely folded, only a triangular blue field of stars should be visible.