Your Guide to New England Fall Events 

New England Fall Events is your best guide for seasonal fun and fall activities

We have state-by-state guides to the best PYO apple picking, pumpkin patches, hayrides, food festivals, harvest celebrations, and events for the fall season. New England Fall Events makes it easy to create new fall traditions and priceless family memories. This is a guide for New Englanders, by New Englanders.

Slow down and savor New England’s fall culture and traditions by celebrating the orchards, farms, small businesses, seasonal attractions, fall festivals, and local food which are the very fabric of our communities.

fall website

http://newenglandfallevents.com/

Fall Maintenance

Exterior Fixes
• Regularly clean gutters and downspouts. Make sure all drainage areas are unblocked by leaves and debris. Consider installing gutter guards to make the job a lot easier.

• Use a screwdriver to probe the wood trim around windows, doors, railings and decks. Use caulk to fill the holes or completely replace the wood.

• Inspect your roof, or hire a licensed professional to examine your roof for wear and tear. If the shingles are curling, buckling or crackling, replace them. If you have a lot of damage, it’s time to replace the entire roof. Also, check the flashing around skylights, pipes and chimneys. If you have any leaks or gaps, heavy snow and ice will find its way in.

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The change in temperature and humidity and normal wear and tear can cause window seals to crack and shrink. Check your windows and doors inside and out for leaks and drafts. Caulk cracks or install weather stripping around windows and doors, including the garage door. Replace screens with storm windows and clean them if needed

• To prevent exterior water pipes from bursting when the weather gets below freezing, turn off the valves to the exterior hose bibs. Run the water until the pipes are empty. Make sure all the water is drained from the pipes, if not; the water can freeze up and damage the pipes.

• Wrap water pipes that run along exterior walls with heating tape. It will save energy and prevent them from freezing.

 

 

System Maintenance
• Clean and replace filters in your furnace or heating system. Contact a licensed heating contractor to inspect and service your gas heater or furnace to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.

• Check the attic to make sure the insulation is installed properly. The vapor barrier on insulation should face down toward the living space. If it is installed incorrectly (with the vapor barrier facing up) then the insulation will trap moisture causing possible water problems. Cut slits in the vapor barrier to allow moisture to escape.

Fall Garden Maintenance
• Fall is the perfect time to divide or move perennials. Remove dead annuals and mulch hardy perennials. Annuals typically die when temperatures drop below freezing. But perennials often appear as though they too have bitten the bullet. That’s because their top growth dies back, although in most cases the root ball is hardy enough to survive even extreme temperatures, especially if it’s covered with a layer of mulch.

• Trim dead branches out the trees to prevent them from coming down and causing damage in a winter storm.

• Rake up the thick layers of leaves that settle on lawn surfaces. Large leaves in particular, especially when they get wet, can compact to the point where they suffocate the grass below and lead to all kinds of insect and disease problems. So it’s a good idea to routinely rake or blow them off the lawn or, better yet, use a mulching mower to shred them into fine pieces.

• Fall is a good time to aerate your lawn; it will allow moisture and nutrients to get into the roots. When you’re done, spread fertilizer then grass seed.

• This will be the ideal time to sow cool-season grasses such as fescue and rye – it will give them the opportunity to germinate and develop a good root system before freezing temperatures arrive. It’s also the right time to fertilize turf grasses, preferably with slow-release, all-natural fertilizer. When given adequate nutrients, turf grasses have the ability to store food in the form of carbohydrates during the winter months. That will mean a better-looking lawn come spring.

 

Check For Pests
• Pests love attics because they are full of nice warm insulation for nesting, and they offer easy access to the rest of the house. With gable vents that lead into the attic it is a good idea to install a screen behind them to keep those critters out.

• Even after closing off those entryways, pests can still find a way in. The first place to check for any unwanted guests is under the kitchen cupboards and appliances.

 

Safety Checks
• Each fall, check carbon monoxide detectors and smoke alarms and put in fresh batteries. These are very important detectors to have in a home. A smoke alarm can save lives in a house fire. A carbon monoxide detector can also save lives if a home has oil or gas-burning appliances, like a furnace or water heater. 

• Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless byproduct of burning oil or natural gas, and it can be deadly. For just a few dollars, a carbon monoxide detector will sound an alarm if the levels get too high.

• Always install carbon monoxide detectors according to manufacturer’s instructions. Generally they should be installed near each potential source of carbon monoxide, and within ear shot of the living and sleeping areas.

• Have your wood-burning fireplace inspected, cleaned and repaired to prevent chimney fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.

New England Fall Events 

 

New England Fall Events is your best guide for seasonal fun and fall activities.

We have state-by-state guides to the best PYO apple picking, pumpkin patches, hayrides, food festivals, harvest celebrations, and events for the fall season. New England Fall Events makes it easy to create new fall traditions and priceless family memories. This is a guide for New Englanders, by New Englanders.

Slow down and savor New England’s fall culture and traditions by celebrating the orchards, farms, small businesses, seasonal attractions, fall festivals, and local food which are the very fabric of our communities.

Courtesy of http://www.newenglandfallevents.com/

New England Fall Events

 

New England Fall Events is your best guide for seasonal fun and fall activities.

We have state-by-state guides to the best PYO apple picking, pumpkin patches, hayrides, food festivals, harvest celebrations, and events for the fall season. New England Fall Events makes it easy to create new fall traditions and priceless family memories. This is a guide for New Englanders, by New Englanders.

Slow down and savor New England’s fall culture and traditions by celebrating the orchards, farms, small businesses, seasonal attractions, fall festivals, and local food which are the very fabric of our communities.

Courtesy of http://www.newenglandfallevents.com/

Fall To-Do Lists For Homeowners

As the days grow shorter, it’s easy to forget that your home needs a little TLC before winter comes calling. By taking care of essential upkeep and repairs now, you can avoid problems during winter!

Days are Shorter!
1Because the sun sets earlier during the winter, you’ll be leaving your lights on for longer stretches of time. Prepare for the increased energy consumption by swapping your incandescent bulbs for LEDs . You’ll spend a bit more per bulb initially, but LED bulbs last longer and save energy

 

Time to Paint!
Thanks to cooler, more comfortable weather, fall is the perfect time to touch up your 2home’s exterior. Be sure not to ruin the renewed finish by using the wrong techniques. Select a high ­quality exterior paint with an acrylic base, and don’t choose a windy day for the job. If your house doesn’t need an entire paint job, consider touching up bare spots, splits, and board ends to protect them from winter weather.

 

Caulking!
3By sealing the gaps around windows and between siding boards in the fall, you can lower your heating bill and eliminate uncomfortably cold drafts in the winter. But before you start patching the holes, remember to remove all existing caulk, because new caulk needs a clean surface to seal properly. Use a razor blade to cut away the old caulk, then wash the area with a good degreasing detergent. Let the spot dry completely before applying new caulk

 

Change Those Filters!
Not only do clean furnace filters improve air quality by removing allergens more 4effectively, they also maximize the operating efficiency of your heating system—and a well­ maintained heating system is a necessity during the winter. Most furnaces need a filter change every one or two months, but you may have to do it more often if you have a very dusty home or pets that shed. Replacing your own filter is relatively simple (with help from the furnace manual), but you can also hire an HVAC professional to clean the furnace, check for the presence of hazardous gases, make any necessary repairs, and replace the filter.

 

Roof Repairs!
8Winter can wreak havoc on a roof that’s seen better days, so it’s important to make repairs before the colder weather arrives, bringing with it the threat of ice dams and accumulations of snow that can cause structural damage. Many homeowners don’t realize, however, that reusing old roofing materials can sabotage repairs. Although recycling a gutter apron or flashing is a tempting way to save money, used materials (especially metal ones) won’t last as long and can increase the risk of weather damage to the roof. Spring for new materials now so you won’t have to face a worn ­out roof later

 

Clean That Chimney!
5Creosote buildup in the flue of a wood ­burning fireplace can trigger a dangerous chimney fire. To ensure your safety as you snuggle next to toasty flames this winter, have your fireplace checked and cleaned by professionals. Chimney sweeps are always busiest in the fall, so be sure to schedule your cleaning early.

 

Check Those Batteries!
Protecting your family from dangerous fumes and fire hazards should always be a top 6priority. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic byproduct of the incomplete combustion of fuels, including natural gas, coal, and wood. It can’t be seen or smelled, so it’s essential that you keep your CO detector (as well as your smoke detectors) working well. To be certain that your detectors never run out of juice, change the batteries when you change your clocks, starting this fall when daylight saving time ends.

 

Get Rid Of Those Leaves!
7Left to pile up in the gutter, decomposing leaves and debris can block downspouts and trap water. As temperatures drop and the water freezes, these blockages can lead to damage to the house as well as the gutter. To clean out your gutters in preparation for winter, wait until all the leaves have fallen from the trees, and pay special attention to safety. Always use a sturdy ladder and wear shoes with nonslip soles. The ladder should be tall enough so you don’t have to stand on the top rung or overreach, both of which increase the risk of falling. Recruit an assistant who can steady the bottom of the ladder and hand up tools.