Your Guide to May

Mark your calendar with these important dates.

Cinco de Mayo

Why do we celebrate Cinco de Mayo? It’s not just an excuse to eat tacos and sip margaritas. Today commemorates Mexico’s victory over French invaders at the Battle of Puebla in 1862.


Mother’s Day

Caretaker, problem-solver, everyday superhero: To be called Mom means all this and more. Show your gratitude to the moms in your life today!


International Nurses Day 

Looking for a way to say thank you to all the nurses working so hard during the pandemic? Have lunch or snacks delivered to your local hospital to show your support.


National Barbecue Day 

Fire up the barbie and enjoy a meal on your deck or in your yard. Did you know that grilling means cooking for a short time over high temps, while barbecuing involves longer times and low temps?

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

People with disabilities encounter barriers every day, not just in the physical world, but online too. You can help change that by raising awareness for accessible online design.


Memorial Day

Our nation owes a debt to its fallen heroes that we can never fully repay, but we can honor their sacrifice.

The month of May is a special time to honor the brave men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces. Here are four ways you can show your appreciation for active service members, veterans, and military families this month:

From letters to baked goods to personal care products, sending a care package is a way to share a little piece of home with service members who are currently deployed overseas. Check out nonprofits like Operation Gratitude or Soldiers’ Angels to get started.

When military parents are deployed or injured, it can put an emotional and financial strain on the family, especially kids. Consider donating to grant and scholarship programs like Our Military Kids or ThanksUSA, which help military children through these hardships by providing access to sports, arts, and educational opportunities.

Whether it’s cutting the grass or cooking a meal, there are veterans and military families in your community — and possibly in your own circle — that could use a helping hand.

Actions may speak louder than words, but words speak volumes, too. If you know someone who has served or is currently serving, take a moment to say thanks for their bravery and sacrifice

Today is Earth Day!

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has changed most of our Spring plans, Celebrating Earth Day doesn’t have to be one of them.

This years Earth Day marks the 50th Earth Day celebration and there are many things you can do by yourself or as a family
.

Here are 10 things you can do at home to celebrate and support Earth Day this year:

  1. Get outdoors Working from home is great, but staying inside all day can be monotonous. To help break up your day and boost your mood, breath in some fresh air by going for a hike, walk, or run during your lunch break or in the evening with the whole family.

  2. Work in your garden Digging your hands in the soil is good for not only your physical health, but your mental health as well. Welcome the spring season by planting native plants, fruits, and vegetables.

  3. Start a compost pile Composting your food waste will reduce the amount of waste you send to a landfill, and once it fully decomposes, you’re left with incredibly rich fertilizer you can use in your garden. 

  4. Build or purchase a rain barrel Collecting all the runoff from our many rain showers will give you an abundance of free water to use to water your plants.

  5. Plant a tree Native trees and shrubs help provide food and habitat for pollinators, birds, and other critters. Planting trees can also be a great way to engage and educate the whole family.

  6. Clean up Take a stroll around your neighborhood and take a trash bag and gloves with you so you can clean up debris along the road or sidewalk. 

  7. Stay home and learn Reducing the amount of time we spend running errands, driving to work, etc. plays a significant role in reducing our carbon footprint. While you’re home, learn with www.epa.gov/earthday

  8. Build birdhouse or bird feeder Share your home with all of the Earth’s creatures by building a birdhouse or bird feeder out of recycled materials, such as an old wood scraps or milk jug, to help out your local avian population.

  9. Brainstorm energy-friendly ideas for around the house Cut back on energy waste and come up with a list of ideas that will make your home save energy this Earth Day, such as switching to LED bulbs, turning off the AC when you’re not home and other simple, energy-efficient ideas.

  10. Go on a nature scavenger hunt  Learn about local flora and fauna this Earth Day by searching for flowers, plants and trees native to your region around your neighborhood. Look for a regionalist list of native plants online to help guide your search!

Massachusetts Hands Free Driving Law Begins February 23rd!


We are all guilty of chatting on the phone as we drive, especially in my line of work, I am doing a lot of work calls as I am getting from point A to point B. My car is my mobile office! It has always been one of my pet peeves seeing drivers texting or just playing on their phones as they drive. I never know where I am safer…driving behind them or just passing them and leaving them behind.  I admit, I have checked an email or text at a stop light, and I have adjusted driving directions on my phone when it is on the dashboard mount, but never while driving. With all that said, I am very happy this law is in place.


Here are the quick details of the new law:

For drivers 18 or over:

  • Can only use electronic devices and mobile phones in hands-free mode and are only permitted to touch devices to activate hands-free mode

  • Are not permitted to hold or support any electronic device/phone

  • Cannot touch phone except to activate the hands-free mode and can only enable when the device is installed or properly mounted to the windshield, dashboard, or center console in a manner that does not impede the operation of the motor vehicle

  • Are not allowed to touch device for texting, emailing, apps, video, or internet use

  • Activation of GPS navigation is permitted when the device is installed or properly mounted

  • Handheld use is allowed only if the vehicle is both stationary and not located in a public travel lane, but is not allowed at red lights or stop signs

  • Voice to text and communication to electronic devices is legal only when device is properly mounted; use of headphone (one ear) is permitted

For drivers under the age of 18:

  • No use any electronic devices. All phone use while driving is illegal, including use in hands-free mode.

The fines for violating the hands-free law are as follows:

  • 1st offense – $100 fine

  • 2nd offense – $250 fine, plus mandatory completion of a distracted driving educational program

  • 3rd and subsequent offenses – $500 fine, plus insurance surcharge and mandatory completion of distracted driving educational program

Drivers will be allowed to use a cell phone to call 911 for an emergency but are advised, if possible, to pull over safely before calling 911.



10 tips for managing driver distractions

  1. Turn it off. Turn your phone off or switch to silent mode before you get in the car. Or better yet, put the phone away in a place it cannot be accessed while driving.

  2. Spread the word. Set up a special message to tell callers that you are driving and you’ll get back to them as soon as possible, or sign up for a service that offers this.

  3. Pull over. If you need to make a call, pull over to a safe area first.

  4. Use your passengers. Ask a passenger to communicate for you.

  5. X the text. Don’t ever text and drive, surf the web or read your email while driving. It is dangerous and against the law in most states.

  6. Know the law. Familiarize yourself with state and local laws before you get in the car.

  7. Prepare. Start your GPS or review maps and directions before you start to drive. If you need help when you are on the road, ask a passenger to help or pull over to a safe location to review the map and/or directions.

  8. Secure your pets. Pets can be a big distraction in the car. Always secure your pets properly before you start to drive.

  9. Keep the kids safe. Pull over to a safe location to address situations with your children in the car.

  10. Focus on the task at hand. Refrain from smoking, eating, drinking, reading and any other activity that takes your mind and eyes off the road.

Your Guide to February

 

#GoRedforWomen and join the movement to end heart disease and stroke by wearing red today.


 Academy Awards 

 Roll out your own red carpet and tune in to see which stars of the silver screen will take home an Oscar® this year.


 

 
Valentine’s Day 

 Fun fact: About 40% of people would like to receive a V-Day gift, but only 25% plan to give one. Better get that box of chocolates, just in case.


 


 Presidents’ Day 

 Happy Birthday, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln!

 

  


Why is it called Fat Tuesday? It’s the direct translation of the French words Mardi (Tuesday) and gras (fat), which reflects the practice of overindulgence that often takes place before lent.

 

  

​​ Leap Day

 It only comes around every four years! But why? The Earth takes 365.242 days to orbit around the sun, so leap years are needed to balance our calendars with those extra hours.

 

 

 

 

Preparation Tips to Protect Your Home from Blizzards & Snowstorms

15 Items You Probably Didn’t Know Were Hazardous Waste — Bob Vila : Trusted Home Renovation & Repair Expert

Many things we use every day in our homes, gardens, or workshops are so common that we may find it hard to believe they’re classified as hazardous waste and should as a result should be disposed of appropriately. Instead, we toss them in the garbage along with ordinary trash and food scraps, where they could…

via 15 Items You Probably Didn’t Know Were Hazardous Waste — Bob Vila : Trusted Home Renovation & Repair Expert

Your Guide to January


National Trivia Day 

Impress your friends with the interesting facts that fill your brain. Or wow a roomful of people by attending a local trivia event!


National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day 

Show support for local officers by sharing a positive story on social media, wearing blue, or displaying blue lights outside your home.


Martin Luther King Jr. Day 

This day is not just about honoring the man; it’s also about contributing to your community to honor his legacy.


National Pie Day [not Pi Day!] 

Sweet or savory, meat or fruit, we really don’t mind as long as it’s pie!


Chinese New Year

Usher in the Year of the Rat with red envelopes, new clothes, and a break from cleaning!

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Have Fun at Work Day

Organize a potluck lunch or ping pong tournament, bring in massage chairs, and take some time out of your day to really enjoy where you work!

The Red Sox lost Babe Ruth to the NY Yankees — for $125,000.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt founded the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which later became known as the March of Dimes.

Alaska became the first noncontiguous state.

The rainbow Apple logo was developed and company founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak introduced the Apple II computer to the public.

HBO aired the pilot episode of The Sopranos, only the second original drama it had ever made (The Wire was the first hour-long drama).

Free online encyclopedia Wikipedia launched.


Celebrities born in January include Hayao Miyazaki, Ellen DeGeneres, Dolly Parton, Oprah Winfrey, and Justin Timberlake.